Wednesday, October 30, 2013

From the Great Beyond Blog Hop

In honor of Halloween, authors; Angela BrownRoland YeomansGwen Gardner, & Tara Tyler are hosting From the Great Beyond Blog Hop! So, everyone join hands, let's contact the dead...

A lover of all things horror, I'm not spooked by ghosts, goblins, and such, but the unknowns and what-ifs send shivers up and down my spine. I've always been fascinated by the concept of the movie, The Birds. Gah! Who wouldn't be creeped out by killer flocks of birds, pecking you slowly to death?



Dame Daphne du Maurier, Lady Browning DBE (1907 - 1989) was an English author and playwright, and she wrote the short story "The Birds" which later was adapted into the film, directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Author du Maurier passed away at the age of 81 in 1989.

Photo courtesy of Wikipedia
I knew I wanted to contact du Maurier for the Great Beyond Blog Hop's séance. However, my original question to her, how did you come up with such the horrific concept for "The Birds" led me to a bigger, OH MY! question.

It seems author Frank Baker believed that du Maurier had plagiarized his novel The Birds (1936) in her short story, "The Birds" (1952). Du Maurier worked as a reader for Baker's publisher when Baker submitted the manuscript. When the movie The Birds was released in 1963, Baker considered pursuing costly litigation against Universal Studios, but never followed through with it.

I discovered not one, but three allegations of plagiarism throughout du Maurier's writing career. O_O

Not to stir up any angry spirits from the great beyond, but what if she did plagiarize? I'd like to think she didn't and go on believing du Maurier wrote one of the most frightening pieces of fiction (in my opinion).

And yet, I wonder...

Don't forget to stop by the other participant's blogs and have a peek at who'd they'd like to contact from the Great Beyond... You can find the list of participants on Gwen's, Roland's, Angela's, or Tara's blogs above.

19 comments:

  1. Three allegations, huh? Interesting. I guess the world will never know.

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  2. Authors "borrow" from those that have went on before but the greats make the elements their own by their own unique style. Neil Gaiman wrote THE BOOKS OF MAGIC for DC comics years before Harry Potter and it certaianly looked like JK Rowling lifted her hero straight from Gaiman's work. But Warner owned the movie rights to HARRY POTTER so nothing was done. Interesting, huh?

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  3. I've plagiarised myself for some papers and assignments (though not in a very, very long time!), but wouldn't even think of taking that much of another writer's idea. When I was younger, I sometimes used language and incidents extremely based on those from books I'd read at the time, but not an exact play-by-play or word-for-word lifting.

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  4. Oh, very interesting. I saw The Birds when I was 5 years old. The scene with the old man getting his eyes picked out terrified me. It'd be interesting to go back and read the 2 Bird stories to compare them. Love this, Candilynn!

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  5. A wise man once said that "there is nothing new under the sun." I think there have been many who see an idea when watching a movie or reading a book and develop that idea into their own work. Maybe the initial idea was anothers but the finished product certainly has been well developed storyline that may bear little or no resemblance to that original idea. *shrugs* Plagiarizing is nothing new--especially back then. Even Shakespeare was so accused.

    Sia McKye Over Coffee

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  6. If there was more than one accusation, it does make you wonder. However, she could've just used the idea and wrote her own story.

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  7. Great choice and an interesting question!

    Happy Halloween!

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  8. I wonder if a story is ever totally original?
    Birds pecking you slowly... to death. Terrifying. *shivers*

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  9. Birds still scare my mother. Love her hair.

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  10. The Birds was a favorite of mine as a kid. I think I'd like to meet her too!

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  11. mysterious background! i always wonder about the minds of horror writers... what dark secrets lurk in their closets? or are they justgood at creating creepy crawlies?!

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  12. Well, plagiarism certainly isn't a new idea. It would be interesting to know what her response would be to such an inquiry. Hmmm....

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  13. I recently realized that I copied a short line from a movie that I'd completely forgotten about and thought I'd just made it up. Now I can say I'm paying homage to the movie, that it's an Easter egg in the book. Haha. Happy Halloween!

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  14. What a fascinating woman... and lovely, too. But THREE COUNTS... in my book, three strikes and you are out. Sadly the odds are against her. BUT she is an interesting character all the same.

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  15. Killer birds are a scary thought. I'd like to think she didn't resort to plagiarism and it's all a coincidence.

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  16. I don't believe she plagiarized anything. Just sour grapes from unsuccessful writers. Remember how many creeps crawled out from the woodwork to sue JK Rowling? Like they were the only ones to ever think of the "boy wizard" or "magic school" ideas before -- yet bunches of them seem to have had these ideas, all before she did.

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  17. Interesting! I agree sour grapes on JK Rowling front.

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  18. Interesting! I agree sour grapes on JK Rowling front.

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