Thursday, September 29, 2011

The Imago's Love at First Stink

Rachael Harrie's Writer's Platform-Building 2nd Campaign Challenge is:

Write a blog post in 200 words or less, excluding the title. It can be in any format, whether flash fiction, non-fiction, humorous blog musings, poem, etc. The blog post should:
  • include the word "imago" in the title
  • include the following 4 random words: "miasma," "lacuna," "oscitate," "synchronicity,"
If you want to give yourself an added challenge (optional and included in the word count), make reference to a mirror in your post.
For those who want an even greater challenge (optional), make your post 200 words EXACTLY!

A HUGE-MONGO Thank you goes out to all the judges and fellow writers who "liked" or voted for my flash fiction piece! I was extremely honored to win 8th place in the challenge.

For those of you who read my first campaign challenge, and know I have a deep, dark secret of liking the freaky & creepy stuff, you'll find this very different, yet still creepy in its own special way. 

I struggled with this one, because the first story that popped into my mind was fiction, and creepy. Very creepy. *Think Silence of the Lambs vs. Kiss the Girls. You know the story: creepy, psycho kills people, hides insect larvae in victim's mouths, damp, dark basements, caves...stuff like that. But, I figured most of y'all who would stop by would be wondering if it was another scary one! So, I had to shake things up a bit. I hope you enjoy my piece! Thanks, Rachael for an extremely challenging challenge! Sorry, no mirror in this one. It's exactly 200 words.
  

The Imago's Love at First Stink


Stapelia gigantea and Green Bottle Flies
The moment the Stapelia gigantea oscitates its flesh-colored petals, a rotten miasma resembling the stench of a rotting corpse, emits into the atmosphere. Also known as, the Carrion Flower, the five-pointed bloom stretches out like a starfish. Tiny fibers or hairs cover the rough texture of the petals. A deep maroon lacuna sits like a cavern in the center of the flower, enticing the Phaenicia sericata (the Green Bottle fly) with its foul odor. The fly crawls in, and is tricked by the scent of decaying meat. While exploring, it pollinates the hermaphrodite plant. Female flies sometimes lay their eggs in the pit of the flower, and in ten hours, the flower is crawling with maggots.

Stapelia gigantea is a succulent plant in the milkweed family. Bees and butterflies pollinate most milkweed plants; however, the Carrion Flower attracts flies as its main pollinator. Young gardeners, especially boys, will enjoy growing this cool and stinky plant. Its immense flowers are ten to twelve inches in diameter, and as long as it's grown outdoors, the scent is only minimally offensive. Author's note: Sensitive sniffers, please take precaution.

As a gardener, I'm in a constant state of perplexity at the synchronicity in nature.


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You can click here to read the rest of the entries! Like mine, if ya do! :))
The Super-Duper Entries of Rachael Harrie's 2nd Campaign Challege

26 comments:

  1. Wow, this is a fascinating post! Sometimes reality is much creepier than fiction.
    Mind is #3.

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  2. I'm stuck in a state of oscitation right now. That was creepy, stinky and educational all at the same time. Ridiculously cool!!!

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  3. Clever and informative! Well done...

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  4. Agree with Jen. Creepier, in some ways, than fiction ... and fascinating. I like it because it's different!

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  5. Nice entry. This was an interesting challenge.

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  6. This is great, Candy. Creepy and educational!

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  7. Jen, Angela, D.J., Sandwiched, Stacy & Angelina, thank you for stopping by to read my rather late non-fiction blurb using four new words I've added to my vocab! (I had to look up all, except synchronicity!)

    I've grown a Carrion Flower before, and it does stink!

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  8. This is like a fascinating educational post. Really well done. Love this one!

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  9. Very interesting! Love the info! ; )

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  10. Hey, thanks for refollowing and sending the link. This has to be first of its kind, an educational piece as interesting as it is creepy, but not so creepy that I was sorry I read it. Satisfied my curiosity without making me feel morbid, an even better trick than your finding a way to include those words in the perfect context, as education. Two thumbs up, plugging nose!

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  11. Thanks, Sher! I went back and forth on this entry. Fiction, non-fiction, and I finally settled in with this one.

    K.T. and Sheri, thanks for visiting and commenting! I've been around to your blogs / entries. I'm really enjoying everyone's diversity with this challenge!

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  12. Found your blog through The Writer Revived blog. Then I googled "imago"! *lol* I tend to stay away from the "maggots and decaying meat" stories in my son's Scientific American magazine, but I read all 200 words of your post and found it very interesting! Congratulations and good on ya for showing the blog love to the contest hub!

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  13. Fascinating post! Those flowers creep me out and I must have a sensitive sniffer because even outdoors the smell is gross. Great job with the challenge.

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  14. Thanks for stopping on by, KentuckyGal! Wow, found me through Elizabeth's site, the blog thing is so cool!
    Raelyn, thanks for visiting, and I have to say, I loved yours, too and all the Scottish talk on your blog! Just reading it makes me want to break out Outlander tonight!

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  15. Ewwwww, gross! (But very well written, Candy!)

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  16. Thanks, Ruth! I appreciate you checking in with my blog and commenting. The Carrion Flower is gross, pretty, but gross!

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  17. Wow, this is fascinating. Loved it!

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  18. Informative and creepy at the same time !
    My entry at no.#185

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  19. This was excellent!

    The imagery in particular, and the intelligent voice. I figured an expert gardener was behind it.

    Great job, Candy! :)

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  20. Thanks bunches, Cherie, Mish, and David! I appreciate y'all stopping by and commenting!

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  21. I love the fact that you used the Carrion Flower as the subject of your piece. And if the challenge words hadn't been in bold I would have never noticed them. Great job!

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  22. Thanks for the blog visit and the comment, F.E.! This was fun to write and the Carrion Flower is an extremely interesting plant, to say the least!

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  23. I love learning new things! Great post!

    The Write Soil

    Mine is # 50.

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  24. Thanks for visiting and commenting, Dawn!

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  25. A very good read and micro fiction story. It was interesting and reinforced by the accompanying photo. Excellent word usage.

    Good job.


    #188

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